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Why is so Little Spent on Educating the Poor?

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  • Tony Addison

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  • Aminur Rahman

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Abstract

If the poor are to benefit from economic growth, then they need the skills that are in growing demand, and the capacity to raise their productivity as smallholder farmers and micro-entrepreneurs. Yet, the poor seldom receive a satisfactory education. Too little is spent on primary education—the category of education of most direct benefit to the poor—while on average public subsidies to secondary education are roughly three times as high as subsidies to primary education, and subsidies to tertiary education are thirty times as high. In consequence, the higher income deciles benefit disproportionately from public spending on education—the share of the richest income quintile (28%) is roughly double that of poorest income quintile (13%) across countries [DIscussion Paper No. 2001/29].

Suggested Citation

  • Tony Addison & Aminur Rahman, 2007. "Why is so Little Spent on Educating the Poor?," Working Papers id:1080, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1080
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gradstein, Mark, 2003. "The political economy of public spending on education, inequality, and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3162, The World Bank.
    2. Michael A. Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International education goals in historical perspective," Development and Comp Systems 0403007, EconWPA.
    3. Gruber, Lloyd & Kosack, Stephen, 2014. "The tertiary tilt: education and inequality in the developing world," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54202, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Gruber, Lloyd & Kosack, Stephen, 2014. "The Tertiary Tilt: Education and Inequality in the Developing World," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 253-272.
    5. Haile, Daniel T., 2005. "Wealth Distribution, Lobbying and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," WIDER Working Paper Series 021, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    Keywords

    poverty; income distribution; education; development;

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