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The effect of increasing financial incentives in a panel survey: an experiment on the British Household Panel Survey, Wave 14

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  • Laurie, Heather

Abstract

This descriptive paper reports the results of an experiment carried out at wave 14 (2004) of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). A split-sample design was used to assess the effect on response rates of increasing the monetary incentive given to survey respondents from £7 per interview to £10 per interview. The results suggest that even though the increase was relatively small, response rates were higher for those receiving the increased incentive amount, an effect that varied by the demographic characteristics and previous response history of respondents.

Suggested Citation

  • Laurie, Heather, 2007. "The effect of increasing financial incentives in a panel survey: an experiment on the British Household Panel Survey, Wave 14," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2007-05
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2007-05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lynn, Peter & Buck, Nick & Burton, Jonathan & Jäckle, Annette & Laurie, Heather, 2005. "A review of methodological research pertinent to longitudinal survey design and data collection," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. F. Thomas Juster & Richard Suzman, 1995. "An Overview of the Health and Retirement Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30, pages 7-56.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sascha Becker & Dolores Messer & Stefan C. Wolter & Sascha O. Becker, 2011. "A Gift is not Always a Gift: Gift Exchange in a Voucher Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 3488, CESifo.
    2. Pforr, Klaus & Blohm, Michael & Blom, Annelies G. & Erdel, Barbara & Felderer, Barbara & Fräßdorf, Mathis & Hajek, Kristin & Helmschrott, Susanne & Kleinert, Corinna & Koch, Achim & Krieger, Ulrich & , 2015. "Are Incentive Effects on Response Rates and Nonresponse Bias in Large-scale, Face-to-face Surveys Generalizable to Germany? Evidence from Ten Experiments," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 740-768.
    3. McGonagle Katherine A. & Schoeni Robert F. & Couper Mick P., 2013. "The Effects of a Between-Wave Incentive Experiment on Contact Update and Production Outcomes in a Panel Study," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 29(2), pages 261-276, September.
    4. Sascha O. Becker & Dolores Messer & Stefan C. Wolter, 2013. "A Gift is Not Always a Gift: Heterogeneity and Long-term Effects in a Gift Exchange Experiment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 80(318), pages 345-371, April.
    5. Burton, Jonathan & Laurie, Heather & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Bryan, Mark L. & Desousa, Carol & Fumagalli, Laura & Jäckle, Annette & Knies, Gundi & Lynn, Peter & Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda & Pudney, Ste, 2008. "Understanding Society. Some preliminary results from the Wave 1 Innovation Panel," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2008-03, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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