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The Effect of Trade Agendas on Regulatory Governance: When the EU Meets the Global South

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  • Andrea C. Bianculli

Abstract

This paper focuses on the significance of regulatory governance at the regional level. In doing so, it analyzes to what extent and how North-South negotiations give rise to particular forms of regulatory governance in the developing world. To what extent do these forms vary across policy areas? Which elements account for the observed differences and similarities? Empirically, the paper explores the negotiation process between the European Union (EU) and the Southern Common Market (Mercosur), which aims to promote trade liberalization on the one hand, and the harmonization of regulatory frameworks on the other. The focus is on the trade and cooperative agendas involved in trade facilitation and education. Findings suggest that the negotiation of North-South agreements impacts on the ways in which different forms of regulatory governance are expressed, but this varies among particular policy issues. Both the type of norm promoted and the capacity building mechanisms envisaged create a particular ideational and material context, all of which in turn affects the actor constellation - type of actor, specific role and network configuration - hence leading to different regulatory governance regimes among policy areas, yet within the same trade negotiation.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea C. Bianculli, 2013. "The Effect of Trade Agendas on Regulatory Governance: When the EU Meets the Global South," KFG Working Papers p0057, Free University Berlin.
  • Handle: RePEc:erp:kfgxxx:p0057
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alasdair R. Young, 2007. "Trade Politics Ain't What It Used to Be: The European Union in the Doha Round," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45, pages 789-811, November.
    2. Ruggie, John Gerard, 1982. "International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(02), pages 379-415, March.
    3. David Evans & Peter Holmes & Michael Gasiorek & James Rollo & Sherman Robinson, 2007. "Assessing Preferential Trading Agreements Using the Sussex Framework," CARIS Working Papers 01, Centre for the Analysis of Regional Integration at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    4. Krasner, Stephen D., 1982. "Regimes and the limits of realism: regimes as autonomous variables," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(02), pages 497-510, March.
    5. Jean-Christophe Maur, 2005. "Exporting Europe's Trade Policy," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(11), pages 1565-1590, November.
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    Keywords

    governance; regulatory politics; international trade;

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