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Some Economics of Digital Content

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  • Dolfsma, W.A.

Abstract

The music industry is currently subject to changes influenced by ongoing digitalisation and informatization that are unprecedented. Other sectors can expect to undergo in the near future what the media industry is going through now – the movie industry being a prime suspect. Each day, some 600,000 copies of movies are exchanged via the Internet, most of these in violation of the copyright laws. The disruptive nature of technological development makes that the market for entertainment products and other content undergoes fundamental changes. Where ‘content’ used to be exchanged attached to a physical carrier, increasingly it has the features of an information product.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolfsma, W.A., 2004. "Some Economics of Digital Content," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2004-036-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:1331
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    File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/1331/ERS%202004%20036%20ORG.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrew Burke, 1996. "How effective are international copyright conventions in the music industry?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(1), pages 51-66, March.
    2. Abbing, Hans, 2002. "Why Are Artists Poor?," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9789053565650, January-M.
    3. Towse, Ruth, 1999. "Copyright and Economic Incentives: An Application to Performers' Rights in the Music Industry," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 369-390.
    4. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumer as subcontractor; digital content; internet market; price discrimination; product development; product differentiation;

    JEL classification:

    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General

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