IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/kyklos/v63y2010i3p461-478.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Creativity, Copyright and the Creative Industries Paradigm

Author

Listed:
  • Ruth Towse

Abstract

The starting point of this article is the paradigm shift in cultural policy from the arts to the broader view of the creative industries that has taken place in many countries, in the European Union and in UN agencies. The emphasis on creative industries as a source of economic growth has highlighted the role of creativity and of copyright as an incentive for it. Little is known, however, about the economics of creativity or what economic incentives it responds to and this is a gap in our understanding of cultural supply that requires detailed research. The application of 'crowding' theory to the motivation for creativity forms a basis for that research, as does work in cultural economics on artists' labour markets. Likewise, economists have almost no empirical evidence about copyright as an incentive to creativity generated by individual creators. Research is, however, held back by data problems concerning the measurement of creative industry output and employment and especially of the supply of core creative content, making claims of the impact of copyright difficult to assess. The impetus for the article is to express these concerns and to emphasis the need for empirical research in this area. Copyright © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruth Towse, 2010. "Creativity, Copyright and the Creative Industries Paradigm," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(3), pages 461-478, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:63:y:2010:i:3:p:461-478
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-6435.2010.00483.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tyler Cowen & Alexander Tabarrok, 2000. "An Economic Theory of Avant-Garde and Popular Art, or High and Low Culture," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 232-253, July.
    2. Michele Boldrin & David Levine, 2002. "The Case Against Intellectual Property," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 209-212, May.
    3. Ruth Towse, 2001. "Creativity, Incentive and Reward," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1953.
    4. Melissa Boyle & Stacy Nazzaro & Debra O’Connor, 2010. "Moral rights protection for the visual arts," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 34(1), pages 27-44, February.
    5. Christine Greenhalgh & Mark Rogers, 2007. "The value of intellectual property rights to firms and society," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(4), pages 541-567, Winter.
    6. Ruth Towse, 2006. "Copyright And Artists: A View From Cultural Economics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(4), pages 567-585, September.
    7. Christine Greenhalgh & Mark Rogers, 2007. "The Value of Intellectual Property Rights to Firms," Discussion Papers 06-036, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    8. Frank, Bjorn, 1996. "On an Art without Copyright," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 3-15.
    9. Frey, Bruno S & Jegen, Reto, 2001. " Motivation Crowding Theory," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(5), pages 589-611, December.
    10. Jürgen Bitzer, 2005. "Measuring Knowledge Stocks: A Process of Creative Destruction," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 379-393, July.
    11. Abbing, Hans, 2002. "Why Are Artists Poor?," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9789053565650.
    12. Richard Watt & Ruth Towse, 2006. "Copyright protection standards and authors' time allocation," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(6), pages 995-1011, December.
    13. Withers, Glenn, 1985. "Artists' Subsidy of the Arts," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(45), pages 290-295, December.
    14. Towse, Ruth, 2001. "Partly for the Money: Rewards and Incentives to Artists," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 473-490.
    15. Michael Rushton, 1998. "The Moral Rights of Artists: Droit Moral ou Droit Pécuniaire?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(1), pages 15-32, March.
    16. Landes, William M & Posner, Richard A, 1989. "An Economic Analysis of Copyright Law," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 325-363, June.
    17. Roberto Cellini & Tiziana Cuccia, 2003. "Incomplete Information and Experimentation in the Arts: A Game Theory Approach," Economia politica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 21-34.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:63:y:2010:i:3:p:461-478. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0023-5962 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.