IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Understanding the Drivers of an 'Entrepreneurial' Economy: Lessons from Japan and the Netherlands


  • André van Stel
  • Ingrid Verheul
  • Hiroyuki Okamuro


Globalization and an increasing importance of knowledge in the production process cause many developed countries to move from a more 'managed' to a more 'entrepreneurial' economy in recent decades. In the former type of economy, large and incumbent firms play a dominant role, exploiting economies of scale in a relatively certain economic environment. In the latter type, small and new firms play an increasingly important role, introducing new products and services in highly uncertain economic environments while quickly adapting to rapidly changing consumer preferences. The speed of adjustment in this transition process from a managed to an entrepreneurial economy varies by country. In this paper we investigate the differences between a more 'managed' economy, Japan, characterized by relatively low levels of entrepreneurial activity, and a more 'entrepreneurial' economy, the Netherlands. Building on earlier work by Hartog et al. (2010), who explain cross-country differences in three measures of entrepreneurial activity using five broad groups of explanatory variables, we apply a decomposition analysis to better understand the differences in entrepreneurial activity between Japan and the Netherlands. We find that, in spite of higher levels of entrepreneurial activity in the Netherlands, the institutional framework in the Netherlands is considerably less favourable to entrepreneurship, compared to Japan. On the other hand, cultural differences between the Netherlands and Japan explain a substantial part of the difference in entrepreneurship rates between the two countries.

Suggested Citation

  • André van Stel & Ingrid Verheul & Hiroyuki Okamuro, 2011. "Understanding the Drivers of an 'Entrepreneurial' Economy: Lessons from Japan and the Netherlands," Scales Research Reports H201102, EIM Business and Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eim:papers:h201102

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andre van Stel, "undated". "COMPENDIA: Harmonizing business ownership data across countries and over time," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2005-05, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
    2. André van Stel & Chantal Hartog & J. Cieslik Cieslik, 2010. "Measuring Business Ownership Across Countries and Over Time: Extending the COMPENDIA Data Base," Scales Research Reports H201019, EIM Business and Policy Research.
    3. Isobel van der Kuip & Ingrid Verheul, 2003. "Early Development of Entrepreneurial Qualities: the Role of Initial Education," Scales Research Reports N200311, EIM Business and Policy Research.
    4. Abe, Yukiko, 2011. "The Equal Employment Opportunity Law and labor force behavior of women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 39-55, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Zwan & Ingrid Verheul & A. Thurik, 2012. "The entrepreneurial ladder, gender, and regional development," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 627-643, October.
    2. Paul, Justin & Shrivatava, Archana, 2016. "Do young managers in a developing country have stronger entrepreneurial intentions? Theory and debate," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1197-1210.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eim:papers:h201102. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster EIM). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.