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Lifespans of the European elite, 800–1800

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  • Cummins, Neil

Abstract

I analyze the adult age at death of 115,650 European nobles from 800 to 1800. Longevity began increasing long before 1800 and the Industrial Revolution, with marked increases around 1400 and again around 1650. Declines in violent deaths from battle contributed to some of this increase, but the majority must reflect other changes in individual behavior. There are historic spatial contours to European elite mortality; Northwest Europe achieved greater adult lifespans than the rest of Europe even by 1000 AD.

Suggested Citation

  • Cummins, Neil, 2017. "Lifespans of the European elite, 800–1800," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 83576, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:83576
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/83576/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Keywood & Jörg Baten, 0. "Elite violence and elite numeracy in Europe from 500 to 1900 CE: roots of the divergence," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 0, pages 1-71.
    2. Robert Stelter & David de la Croix & Mikko Myrskylä, 2020. "Leaders And Laggards In Life Expectancy Among European Scholars From The Sixteenth To The Early Twentieth Century," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2020024, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    3. Baten, Jörg & Keywood, Thomas, 2019. "Elite Violence and Elite Numeracy in Europe from 500 to 1900 CE: A Co-Evolution?," CEPR Discussion Papers 14013, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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