IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ehl/lserod/24869.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Credit card debt and default over the life-cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Lopes, Paula

Abstract

This paper solves an empirically parameterised model of life-cycle consumption which extends the precautionary savings models of Carroll (1997), and Deaton (1991), to allow for uncollaterized borrowing and default. In case households choose to default: (i) their access to credit markets is restricted; (ii) lenders of funds may seize their financial assets above an exemption level, and up to the amount of outstanding debt; and (iii) there is a “stigma effect,” or a decrease in current utility caused by the social embarrassment of declaring bankruptcy. The model shows that the decisions to borrow and default are closely related to the shape of the life-cycle labor income profile, and henceforth vary across household education levels. Moreover, the model explains two puzzling empirical facts: (a) why bankruptcy rates have been growing in periods of economic expansion and low unemployment; and, (b) why households hold simultaneously high cost debt and low return assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Lopes, Paula, 2003. "Credit card debt and default over the life-cycle," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24869, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24869
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/24869/
    File Function: Open access version.
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tauchen, George & Hussey, Robert, 1991. "Quadrature-Based Methods for Obtaining Approximate Solutions to Nonlinear Asset Pricing Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(2), pages 371-396, March.
    2. Kehoe, Timothy J & Levine, David K, 2001. "Liquidity Constrained Markets versus Debt Constrained Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(3), pages 575-598, May.
    3. Christopher D. Carroll, 1997. "Buffer-Stock Saving and the Life Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 1-55.
    4. David Laibson & Andrea Repetto & Jeremy Tobacman, 2000. "A Debt Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 7879, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Narayana R. Kocherlakota, 1996. "Implications of Efficient Risk Sharing without Commitment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(4), pages 595-609.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer credit; Life cycle; Credit card; Personal bankruptcy;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24869. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (LSERO Manager). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.