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Five Perspectives on an Emerging Market: Challenges with Clean Tech Private Equity

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  • Eric R. W. Knight

    (University of Oxford)

Abstract

Private equity investment in technologies which deliver low carbon energy has grown as an area of both economic and social performance. This article offers a perspective on some of the challenges in the industry. It relies on case studies drawn from thirty five interviews with leading clean tech investment managers across Silicon Valley, New York and London. The findings suggest that despite the long-term growth opportunities, some investors have struggled to find attractive risk-reward premiums in early stage investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric R. W. Knight, 2011. "Five Perspectives on an Emerging Market: Challenges with Clean Tech Private Equity," CCEP Working Papers 1110, Centre for Climate & Energy Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:ccepwp:1110
    as

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    File URL: http://ccep.anu.edu.au/data/2011/pdf/wpapers/CCEP1110Knight.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bürer, Mary Jean & Wüstenhagen, Rolf, 2009. "Which renewable energy policy is a venture capitalist's best friend? Empirical evidence from a survey of international cleantech investors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 4997-5006, December.
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    1. Bunch of New CCEP Working Papers
      by David Stern in Stochastic Trend on 2011-08-08 05:45:00

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General

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