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The daily and policy-relevant liquidity effects

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  • Thornton, Daniel L.

Abstract

The phrase "liquidity effect" was introduced by Milton Friedman (1969) to describe the first of three effects on interest rates caused by an exogenous change in the money supply. The lack of empirical support for the liquidity effect using monthly and quarterly data using various monetary and reserve aggregates led Hamilton (1997) to suggest that more convincing evidence of the liquidity effect could be obtained using daily data - the daily liquidity effect. This paper investigates the implications of the daily liquidity effect for Friedman's liquidity effect using a comprehensive model of the Fed's daily operating procedure. The evidence indicates that it is no easier to find convincing evidence of a Friedman's liquidity effect using daily data than it has been using lower frequency data. JEL Classification: E40, E52

Suggested Citation

  • Thornton, Daniel L., 2008. "The daily and policy-relevant liquidity effects," Working Paper Series 984, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:2008984
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William E. Gibson, 1970. "The Lag in the Effect of Monetary Policy on Income and Interest Rates," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 288-300.
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    4. Thornton, Daniel L., 2005. "Tests of the expectations hypothesis: Resolving the anomalies when the short-term rate is the federal funds rate," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 2541-2556, October.
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    7. Daniel L. Thornton, 2001. "Identifying the liquidity effect at the daily frequency," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 59-82.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thornton, Daniel L., 2014. "Monetary policy: Why money matters (and interest rates don’t)," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 202-213.
    2. Abbassi, Puriya & Nautz, Dieter, 2012. "Monetary transmission right from the start: On the information content of the Eurosystem's main refinancing operations," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 54-69.
    3. Jérôme Vandenbussche & Szabolcs Blazsek & Stanley Watt, 2012. "The liquidity and liquidity distribution effects in emerging markets: evidence from Jordan," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 231-242, February.
    4. Olav Syrstad, 2012. "The daily liquidity effect in a floor system – Empirical evidence from the Norwegian market," Working Paper 2012/14, Norges Bank.
    5. Signe Krogstrup & Samuel Reynard & Barbara Sutter, 2012. "Liquidity Effects of Quantitative Easing on Long-Term Interest Rates," Working Papers 2012-02, Swiss National Bank.
    6. Morgunov, V.I., 2016. "The Liquidity Management of the Banking Sector and the Short-Term Money Market Interest Rates," Working Papers 21311, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    federal funds rate; FOMC; liquidity effect; monetary policy; operating procedure;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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