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The Lost Decade in the Japanese Labor Market : Labor’s share and Okun’s Law

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  • Shigeru Wakita

    (PRI)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to reexamine two empirical regularities in the Japanese labor market : the constant labor share and Okun's law. The former law relates to the price of labor in the labor market while the latter is a quantity law; they represent suitable benchmarks for judging the condition of the labor market. Although there are more elaborate statistical techniques, these laws are frequently used because they can clarify the macroeconomic situation at a glance. First, a constant labor share is implied in theory by the CobbDouglas production function. Thus, labors share should be based on the production function. Labors share based on income has only been rising because of massive depreciation. Secondly, there have been several structural breaks in Okun's law since the bubble collapsed, and the potential growth rate has fallen.

Suggested Citation

  • Shigeru Wakita, 2006. "The Lost Decade in the Japanese Labor Market : Labor’s share and Okun’s Law," Labor Economics Working Papers 22317, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:laborw:22317
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    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22317
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kessing, Sebastian G., 2003. "A note on the determinants of labour share movements," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 9-12, October.
    2. Boldrin, Michael & Horvath, Michael, 1995. "Labor Contracts and Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 972-1004, October.
    3. Cadiou, Loic & Dees, Stephane & Laffargue, Jean-Pierre, 2003. "A computational general equilibrium model with vintage capital," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(11-12), pages 1961-1991, September.
    4. Gomme, Paul & Greenwood, Jeremy, 1995. "On the cyclical allocation of risk," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 91-124.
    5. Clark, Peter K., 1989. "Trend reversion in real output and unemployment," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 15-32, January.
    6. Andrew Young, 2004. "Labor's Share Fluctuations, Biased Technical Change, and the Business Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(4), pages 916-931, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gerald A. Epstein & Tom Schlesinger & Matías Vernengo (ed.), 2014. "Banking, Monetary Policy and the Political Economy of Financial Regulation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13460.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor share; Okun's law;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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