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Médecins généralistes à faibles revenus : une préférence pour le loisir ?

Listed author(s):
  • Anne-Laure Samson

This article looks at a remarkable point in the GPs'population : the existence of a large minority of low income physicians. 5 to 7 % of GPs earn less that 1.5 net SMIC (French minimum wage). These GPs are more frequently women or physicians practicing in areas where the medical density is very high but also where the quality of life is better. Using an econometric analysis, we measure their reaction to a demand shock. We find that these GPs never react to a positive demand shock and only react to a negative one : their activity decreases when they are constrained to. We show that their low income results from a greater preference for leisure. Their very low level of activity reflects an advantage of the profession of self-employed physician : GPs may choose to work less.

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File URL: http://economix.fr/pdf/dt/2009/WP_EcoX_2009-01.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX in its series EconomiX Working Papers with number 2009-1.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: 2009
Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2009-1
Contact details of provider: Postal:
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Web page: http://economix.fr
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  1. McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Physician agency," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 461-536 Elsevier.
  2. Colin Camerer & Linda Babcock & George Loewenstein & Richard Thaler, 1997. "Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers: One Day at a Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 407-441.
  3. Brigitte Dormont & Anne-Laure Samson, 2008. "Medical Demography and Intergenerational inequalities in GPs' earnings," Post-Print halshs-00351781, HAL.
  4. Henry S. Farber, 2005. "Is Tomorrow Another Day? The Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 46-82, February.
  5. Bolduc, Denis & Fortin, Bernard & Fournier, Marc-Andre, 1996. "The Effect of Incentive Policies on the Practice Location of Doctors: A Multinomial Probit Analysis," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 703-732, October.
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