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Stimulus Without Debt

Listed author(s):
  • LAURENCE SEIDMAN

    ()

    (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)

A sobering lesson from the Great Recession is that widespread worry about government debt generates strong political resistance to enacting a fiscal stimulus large enough to overcome a severe recession. Fortunately there is a way to implement fiscal stimulus without increasing government debt. The purpose of this article is to explain the stimulus-without-debt plan, defend it, and urge Keynesian economists to advocate it in today’s weak recovery and in future recessions. Under the plan, in a severe recession, fiscal stimulus enacted by Congress should be accompanied by a “dual-mandate transfer” from the Federal Reserve to the U.S. Treasury of the same magnitude so that the Treasury does not have to borrow to finance the fiscal stimulus. This article contrasts this stimulus-without-debt plan with alternative stimulus plans.

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File URL: http://www.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2014/UDWP2014-01.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Delaware, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 14-01.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:14-01.
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Purnell Hall, Newark, Delaware 19716

Phone: (302) 831-2565
Fax: (302) 831-6968
Web page: http://lerner.udel.edu/departments/economics/department-economics/

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  1. Kenneth A. Lewis & Laurence S. Seidman, 2011. "Did the 2008 rebate fail? a response to Taylor and Feldstein," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 183-204, January.
  2. Laurence Seidman, 2012. "Keynesian stimulus versus classical austerity," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(0), pages 77-92.
  3. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Identifying Government Spending Shocks: It's all in the Timing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 1-50.
  4. Jonathan A. Parker & Nicholas S. Souleles & David S. Johnson & Robert McClelland, 2013. "Consumer Spending and the Economic Stimulus Payments of 2008," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(6), pages 2530-2553, October.
  5. Nicholas S. Souleles & Jonathan A. Parker & David S. Johnson, 2006. "Household Expenditure and the Income Tax Rebates of 2001," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1589-1610, December.
  6. Laurence Seidman, 2011. "Keynesian Fiscal Stimulus: What Have We Learned from the Great Recession?," Working Papers 11-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  7. Laurence Seidman, 2011. "Great Depression II," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 54(1), pages 32-53, January.
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