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Tracing out the Effects of Demographic Changes on the Income Distribution. The Case of Greater Buenos Aires 1980-2000

  • Mariana Marchionni

    ()

    (Centro de Estudios Distributivos, Laborales y Sociales (CEDLAS) FCE - UNLP)

  • Leonardo Gasparini

    ()

    (Centro de Estudios Distributivos, Laborales y Sociales (CEDLAS) FCE - UNLP)

During the last two decades fertility decisions have varied significantly and not uniformly along the income distribution. In this paper we study the effects of these demographic changes on two dimensions of the income distribution -poverty and inequality- by applying microeconometric decompositions techniques. In particular, we simulate the equivalized household income distribution that would emerge if individuals in time t took fertility decisions as in time t’. The results suggest that these demographic factors can account for a of the actual increase in poverty and inequality between 1980 y 1992.

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File URL: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/archivos_upload/doc_cedlas4.pdf
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Paper provided by CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata in its series CEDLAS, Working Papers with number 0004.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0004
Contact details of provider: Postal: Calle 48 No555 - La Plata (1900)
Phone: 21- 1466
Fax: 54-21-25-9536
Web page: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/

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  1. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
  2. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
  3. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Walter Sosa Escudero, 2000. "Characterization of inequality changes through microeconometric decompositions. The case of Greater Buenos Aires," Department of Economics, Working Papers 025, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  4. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  5. Guillermo Cruces & Sebastian Galiani, 2003. "Generalizing the Causal Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Supply," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2003-625, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
  7. Francois Bourguignon & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Nora Lusting, 2005. "The Microeconomics of Income Distribution Dynamics in East Asia and Latin America," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14844.
  8. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  9. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
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