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Political economy and life course patterns: the heterogeneity of occupational, family and household trajectories of young spaniards

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  • Pau Baizán Munoz

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Francesca Michielin

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Francesco C. Billari

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

We explore the strong linkages between macro changes and the dynamics of educational, occupational, family, and residential careers of young Spanish adults born between 1945 and 1974. We review theory and evidence on macro factors: changes in the welfare system, centrality of the family as a service provider, and the changing role of women. We outline some hypotheses of how life course trajectories, and their heterogeneity, change across cohorts. We build data on sequences of states using FFS. In our analysis, we find an increase in the discontinuity of careers and of the heterogeneity among cohort members, especially for employment. Women´s careers are becoming more similar to those of men. Family and household formation is postponed, with a limited spread of post-nuclear family forms.

Suggested Citation

  • Pau Baizán Munoz & Francesca Michielin & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Political economy and life course patterns: the heterogeneity of occupational, family and household trajectories of young spaniards," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-037, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2001-037
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/WP-2001-037.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Saint-Paul, Gilles, 2000. "Flexibility vs. Rigidity: Does Spain have the worst of both Worlds?," IZA Discussion Papers 144, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Samuel Bowles, 1998. "Endogenous Preferences: The Cultural Consequences of Markets and Other Economic Institutions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 75-111, March.
    3. Marimon, Ramon & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1998. "'Actual' versus 'virtual' employment in Europe Is Spain different?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 123-153, January.
    4. Pau Baizán Munoz & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Cohabitation, marriage, first birth: the interrelationship of family formation events in Spain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-036, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Santiago Alvarez García & Ursicino Carrascal Arranz, "undated". "La reforma del IRPF y el tratamiento de la familia: El coste de los hijos y su compensación mediante el mínimo familiar," Studies on the Spanish Economy 34, FEDEA.
    6. Namkee Ahn & Pedro Mira, "undated". "Job bust, baby bust: the Spanish case," Working Papers 99-06, FEDEA.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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