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Renegotiation-Proof Equilibria: Collective Rationality and Intertemporal Cooperation

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Abstract

Cooperation in repeated games relies on the possibility that equilibrium play following some t-period history depends on more than simply the structure of the game remaining after the first t periods, that structure being always the same. In a nondegenerate theory of renegotiation, what a player expects, and the statements he finds credible at the end of period t must be affected by the history that has transpired, and perhaps by the implicit agreement that was in force. The solution concept proposed in this paper acknowledges both these influences, while imposing a certain stationarity on beliefs regarding what renegotiation options are available: renegotiation to an equilibrium sigma will not take place if, after some history h, the continuation equilibrium sigma given h is itself vulnerable to renegotiation to sigma (in the sense that all players prefer sigma to sigma given h).

Suggested Citation

  • David G. Pearce, 1987. "Renegotiation-Proof Equilibria: Collective Rationality and Intertemporal Cooperation," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 855, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:855
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    Cited by:

    1. Osterdal, Lars Peter, 2005. "Bargaining power in repeated games," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 101-110, January.
    2. Xue, Licun, 2002. "Stable agreements in infinitely repeated games," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 165-176, March.
    3. Ludema, Rodney D., 2001. "Optimal international trade agreements and dispute settlement procedures," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 355-376, June.
    4. Ferreira, José Luis & Moreno, Diego, 1995. "Cooperación y renegociación en juegos no cooperativos," DE - Documentos de Trabajo. Economía. DE 3363, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    5. Matsui, Akihiko, 1989. "Information leakage forces cooperation," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 94-115, March.
    6. Timothy L. Sorenson, 2007. "Credible collusion in multimarket oligopoly," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 115-128.
    7. MacLeod, W. Bentley, 2006. "Reputations, Relationships and the Enforcement of Incomplete Contracts," IZA Discussion Papers 1978, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Klimenko, Mikhail & Ramey, Garey & Watson, Joel, 2008. "Recurrent trade agreements and the value of external enforcement," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 475-499, March.
    9. Geir Asheim & Jon Strand, 1991. "Long-term union-firm contracts," Journal of Economics, Springer, pages 161-184.
    10. Ales, Laurence & Sleet, Christopher, 2014. "Revision proofness," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 324-355.
    11. Kai-Uwe Kühn, 2005. "Collusion Theory in Search of Robust Themes: A Comment on Switgard Feuerstein's Survey," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 207-215, December.
    12. David G. Pearce, 1991. "Repeated Games: Cooperation and Rationality," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 983, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    13. Christopher Phelan & Ennio Stacchetti, 2001. "Sequential Equilibria in a Ramsey Tax Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(6), pages 1491-1518, November.
    14. Rohan Pitchford & Mark L. J. Wright, 2013. "On the contribution of game theory to the study of sovereign debt and default," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(4), pages 649-667, WINTER.
    15. Blonski, Matthias & Spagnolo, Giancarlo, 2002. "Relational Contracts and Property Rights," CEPR Discussion Papers 3460, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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