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The Share Economy: A Symposium

In 1985-06, the Yale Economics Department sponsored a half-day conference on Martin Weitzman's striking proposal that sharing would be introduced into compensation arrangements. His suggestions have received wide attention in the popular press and from economists, but the organizers believed that the suggestions were sufficiently novel and promising to warrant careful scrutiny from a wide range of points of view. The conference participants therefore examined the "share economy" from the vantage point of labor economics, capital theory, general equilibrium theory, and macroeconomics.

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Paper provided by Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University in its series Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers with number 783.

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Length: 80 pages
Date of creation: Feb 1986
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:783
Contact details of provider: Postal: Yale University, Box 208281, New Haven, CT 06520-8281 USA
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Order Information: Postal: Cowles Foundation, Yale University, Box 208281, New Haven, CT 06520-8281 USA

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  1. Oswald, Andrew J., 1993. "Efficient contracts are on the labour demand curve : Theory and facts," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 85-113, June.
  2. Dow, Gregory K., 1986. "Control rights, competitive markets, and the labor management debate," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 48-61, March.
  3. Snower, Dennis J, 1983. "Imperfect Competition, Underemployment and Crowding-Out," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(0), pages 245-70, Supplemen.
  4. Meade, James E, 1972. "The Theory of Labour-Managed Firms and of Profit Sharing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(325), pages 402-28, Supplemen.
  5. Clark, Colin, 1979. "Wages and profits," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 245-266.
  6. Mitchell, Daniel J B, 1985. "Wage Flexibility in the United States: Lessons from the Past," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 36-40, May.
  7. Russell Cooper & John Andrew, 1985. "Coordinating Coordination Failures in Keynesian Models," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 745R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Jul 1985.
  8. Martin L. Weitzman, 1985. "Increasing Returns and the Foundations of Unemployment Theory: An Explanation," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 7(3), pages 403-409, April.
  9. Dreze, Jacques H, 1976. "Some Theory of Labor Management and Participation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(6), pages 1125-39, November.
  10. Weitzman, Martin L, 1985. "Profit Sharing as Macroeconomic Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 41-45, May.
  11. Hamada, Koichi & Kurosaka, Yoshio, 1984. "The relationship between production and unemployment in Japan : Okun's law in comparative perspective," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 71-94, June.
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