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Skilled Migration and Economic Performances: evidence from OECD countries

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  • Gianluca OREFICE

    (University of Milano and Centro Studi Luca DAgliano)

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of immigration flows and their skill content on per capita GDP in 24 OECD host countries. Theoretical models concludes that the effect of immigrants in host country's income depends on the capital content of migrants (Benhabib 1996); empirically the question is still open and this paper contributes to make light on this. So we propose an empirical estimation on the effects of immigrants and their skill level on per capita GDP. Using a IV model to solve the endogeneity problem we found that high skilled migration has a positive effect on per capita GDP, but it is not enough to fully compensate the overall negative effects of migration on per capita GDP.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianluca OREFICE, 2010. "Skilled Migration and Economic Performances: evidence from OECD countries," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2010015, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2010015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kang, Youngho & Kim, Byung-Yeon, 2012. "Immigration and Economic Growth: Do Origin and Destination Matter?," MPRA Paper 39695, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Chepel, S. & Bondarenko, K., 2015. "Is the External Labor Migration an Economic Growth Factor: Econometric Analysis and Policy Implications for the CIS Countries," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 142-166.
    3. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    4. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    5. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    6. World Bank Group, 2015. "Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23565, The World Bank.
    7. Uri Dadush & Mona Niebuhr, 2016. "The Economic Impact of Forced Migration," Research papers & Policy papers 1605, OCP Policy Center.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; economic performances; factor mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation

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