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Old Issues in New Regionalism

  • Christopher Findlay

There has been a burst of interest in regional trading arrangements in the Asia Pacific region. Business pressures, frustration with the multilateral process, renewed interests in regional autonomy and domino effects have contributed to the interest in a preferential route. But the use of these arrangements leads to serious risks of new layers of discrimination in the regional trading system, and to a marked change in strategy for trade liberalisation in East Asia. Hopes that this route to reform will be successful may yet be disappointed. Even so, individual economies must design strategic responses to the change in the policy environment, with a long-run goal of returning liberalisation to the nondiscriminatory track.

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File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/pdf/pep/pep-311.pdf
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Paper provided by Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University in its series Asia Pacific Economic Papers with number 311.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:csg:ajrcau:311
Contact details of provider: Postal: Canberra ACT 2601
Phone: (61-2) 6249 3780
Fax: (61-2) 6249 3941
Web page: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/research_units/ajrc/
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  1. Gandal, N. & Shy, O., 1996. "Standardization Policy and International Trade," Papers 12-96, Tel Aviv - the Sackler Institute of Economic Studies.
  2. Levy, Philip I, 1997. "A Political-Economic Analysis of Free-Trade Agreements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 506-19, September.
  3. Arvind Panagariya, 2000. "Preferential Trade Liberalization: The Traditional Theory and New Developments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(2), pages 287-331, June.
  4. Anderson, Kym & Snape, Richard H, 1994. "European and American Regionalism: Effects on and Options for Asia," CEPR Discussion Papers 983, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Snape, Richard H, 1996. "Trade Discrimination--Yesterday's Problem?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(219), pages 381-96, December.
  6. Anne O. Krueger, 1995. "Free Trade Agreements versus Customs Unions," NBER Working Papers 5084, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Christopher Findlay, 1997. "The APEC Air Transport Schedule," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 273, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  8. John McLaren, 2002. "A Theory Of Insidious Regionalism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 571-608, May.
  9. Elek, A. & Findlay, C. & Hooper, P. & Warren, T., 1999. "“Open skies†or open clubs? New issues for Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 143-151.
  10. Ronald J. Wonnacott, 1996. "Trade and Investment in a Hub-and-Spoke System Versus a Free Trade Area," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 237-252, 05.
  11. Richard E. Baldwin, 1997. "The Causes of Regionalism," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(7), pages 865-888, November.
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