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Productivity Growth, Human Capital, and Technology Spillovers: Nonparametric Evidence for EU Regions

  • Badinger, Harald
  • Egger, Peter
  • von Ehrlich, Maximilian

This paper assesses the strength of productivity spillovers non-parametrically in a data-set of 12 industries and 231 NUTS2 regions in 17 European Union member countries between 1992 and 2006. It devotes particular attention to measuring catching up through spillovers depending on the technology gap of a unit to the industry leader and the local human capital endowment. We find evidence of a non-monotonic relationship between the technology gap to the leader as well as human capital and growth. Spillovers are strongest for units with a small technology gap to the leader and with abundant human capital.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 9425.

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Date of creation: Apr 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9425
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  1. Richard Kneller & Philip Andrew Stevens, 2006. "Frontier Technology and Absorptive Capacity: Evidence from OECD Manufacturing Industries," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(1), pages 1-21, 02.
  2. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  3. Griffith, Rachel & Harrison, Rupert & Van Reenen, John, 2004. "How Special is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of US R&D Spillovers on UK Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing," CEPR Discussion Papers 4698, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & John Van Reenen, 2000. "Mapping the two faces of R&D : productivity growth in a panel of OECD industries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 784, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. DiNardo, John & Tobias, Justin, 2001. "Nonparametric Density and Regression Estimation," Staff General Research Papers 12020, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Author-Name: Jeffrey D. Sachs & John W. McArthur & Guido Schmidt-Traub & Margaret Kruk & Chandrika Bahadur & Michael Faye & Gordon McCord, 2004. "Ending Africa's Poverty Trap," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 35(1), pages 117-240.
  7. Yatchew,Adonis, 2003. "Semiparametric Regression for the Applied Econometrician," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521012263.
  8. Rachel Griffith & Rupert Harrison & John Van Reenen, 2004. "How special is the special relationship?: using the impact of R&D spillovers on UK firms as a test of technology sourcing," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 711, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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