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No trade, one-way or two-way trade?

Author

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  • Okubo, Toshihiro
  • Picard, Pierre M
  • Thisse, Jacques-François

Abstract

We study how the level of trade costs and the intensity of competition can explain the existence of two-way, one-way or no trade within the same industry. As trade costs decrease from very high to very low values, the economy moves from autarky to a regime of two-way trade, through a regime of one-way trade from the larger to the smaller country. Trade is less likely when the economy gets more competitive. Finally once capital is mobile across countries, the market delivers an outcome in which capital is too much concentrated in the large country.

Suggested Citation

  • Okubo, Toshihiro & Picard, Pierre M & Thisse, Jacques-François, 2010. "No trade, one-way or two-way trade?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8161, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Debaere, Peter & Demiroglu, Ufuk, 2003. "On the similarity of country endowments," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 101-136, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Goksel, Turkmen, 2012. "Financial constraints and international trade patterns," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2222-2225.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital mobility; country asymmetry; trade regime;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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