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Earnings, Schooling and Economic Reform: New Econometric Evidence


  • Campos, Nauro F
  • Jolliffe, Dean


How does the relationship between earnings and schooling change with the introduction of comprehensive economic reform? This Paper uses a unique dataset (covering about 3 million Hungarian wage earners, from 1986 to 1998) and a novel procedure to correct sample selection bias (based on DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux’s) to shed light on this question. We find that reform was successful in general, increasing returns to skill by 70.5%, but that there were winners and losers. The winners seem to be the college and university educated, those employed by the smaller firms and those in commerce and services. The losers are those in manufacturing and agriculture and, surprisingly, those who received their formal education after the initiation of reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Campos, Nauro F & Jolliffe, Dean, 2004. "Earnings, Schooling and Economic Reform: New Econometric Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 4716, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4716

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Flabbi, Luca & Paternostro, Stefano & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2008. "Returns to education in the economic transition: A systematic assessment using comparable data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 724-740, December.

    More about this item


    economic reform; human capital; transition economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General

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