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Looking for Contagion: the Evidence from the ERM

Author

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  • Favero, Carlo A.
  • Giavazzi, Francesco

Abstract

This paper applies a full-information technique to test for the presence of contagion across the money markets of ERM members. We show that whenever it is possible to estimate a model for interdependence, a test for contagion based o a full information technique is more powerful. We test for the presence of contagion after having identified episodes of country-specific shocks, whose effect on other European markets is significantly different from those predictable from the estimated channels of interdependence. Using data on three-month interest rate spreads on German rates for seven countries over the period 1988–1992, we are unable to reject the null of contagion. Our evidence suggests that contagion within the ERM was a general phenomenon not limited to a subset of weaker countries, the exception in our sample being France. Our result are mute as to the question of what lies behind these episodes of contagion; they show, however, that it is not always that one only detects contagion when one applies poor statistical techniques.

Suggested Citation

  • Favero, Carlo A. & Giavazzi, Francesco, 2000. "Looking for Contagion: the Evidence from the ERM," CEPR Discussion Papers 2591, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2591
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Cipollini, Andrea & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2005. "Testing for contagion: a conditional correlation analysis," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 476-489, June.
    2. Sander, Harald & Kleimeier, Stefanie, 2003. "Contagion and causality: an empirical investigation of four Asian crisis episodes," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 171-186, April.
    3. Margarida Abreu, 2003. "Contagion Phenomena in Financial Crises: Evidence from the Portuguese and Spanish Exchange Rate Crises in the Early Nineties," Working Papers Department of Economics 2003/05, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    4. Coudert, Virginie & Couharde, Cécile & Mignon, Valérie, 2011. "Exchange rate volatility across financial crises," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 3010-3018, November.
    5. Sergio L. Schmukler, 2004. "Financial globalization: gain and pain for developing countries," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 2, pages 39-66.
    6. Renee Fry & Vance Martin & Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo & Mardi Dungey, 2002. "International Contagion Effects from the Russian Crisis and the LTCM Near-Collapse," IMF Working Papers 02/74, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Fazio, Giorgio, 2007. "Extreme interdependence and extreme contagion between emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1261-1291, December.
    8. Toni Gravelle & Maral Kichian & James Morley, 2003. "Shift Contagion in Asset Markets," Staff Working Papers 03-5, Bank of Canada.
    9. Wajih Khallouli, 2008. "Shift-Contagion in Middle East and North Africa Stock Markets," Working Papers 420, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Jan 2008.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Contagion; ERM; Interdependence;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • F40 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - General

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