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Settlement Location Shapes Refugee Integration: Evidence from Post-war Germany

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  • Braun, Sebastian T.
  • Dwenger, Nadja

Abstract

Following one of the largest displacements in human history, almost eight million forced migrants arrived in West Germany after WWII. We study empirically how the settlement location of migrants affected their economic, social and political integration in West Germany. We first document large differences in integration outcomes across West German counties. We then show that high inflows of migrants and a large agrarian base hampered integration. Religious differences between migrants and natives had no effect on economic integration. Yet, they decreased intermarriage rates and strengthened anti-migrant parties. Based on our estimates, we simulate the regional distribution of migrants that maximizes their labor force participation. Inner-German migration in the 1950s brought the actual distribution closer to its optimum.

Suggested Citation

  • Braun, Sebastian T. & Dwenger, Nadja, 2019. "Settlement Location Shapes Refugee Integration: Evidence from Post-war Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 14194, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Forced Migration; Post-War Germany; Regional Integration;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-

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