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Employment protection legislation; lessons from theoretical and empirical studies for the Dutch case


  • Anja Deelen


  • Egbert Jongen


  • Sabine Visser



Employment protection is a hotly debated topic. In this document we review the theoretical and empirical studies on the impact of employment protection. Subsequently, we confront the findings of these studies with the Dutch setup, and consider a number of reform options.

Suggested Citation

  • Anja Deelen & Egbert Jongen & Sabine Visser, 2006. "Employment protection legislation; lessons from theoretical and empirical studies for the Dutch case," CPB Document 135, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:docmnt:135

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. A. Bovenberg & Coen Teulings, 2009. "Rhineland exit?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(5), pages 710-726, October.
    2. Mathijs Gerritsen & Jens Høj, 2013. "The Dutch Labour Market: Preparing for the Future," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1012, OECD Publishing.
    3. Egbert Jongen, 2009. "An analysis of individual accounts for the unemployment risk in the Netherlands," CPB Document 186, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    4. Wolfgang Ochel, 2009. "Niederlande: Ein neuer Weg zu mehr Flexicurity," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 62(01), pages 58-61, January.
    5. Wolfgang Ochel, 2008. "The Political Economy of Two-tier Reforms of Employment Protection in Europe," CESifo Working Paper Series 2461, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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