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Economía formal y economía informal: un estudio sobre la dinámica del crecimiento económico en un modelo de inspiración clásica

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  • Tobón, A

Abstract

El objetivo de este documento de trabajo es mostrar las consecuencias de introducir el fenómeno de la informalidad en una modelo de inspiración clásica. La informalidad se introduce considerando un dualismo entre un sector formal que paga el impuesto sobre el beneficio bruto, y un sector informal que evade el pago de dicho impuesto, ante la incapacidad de enforcement por parte del gobierno. A medida que se imponen diferentes hipótesis sobre los impuestos, se puede estudiar la dinámica de la tasa de crecimiento de cada sector, de la tasa de beneficio de los empresarios y de los precios relativos de los bienes. Bajo ciertas condiciones, el modelo muestra una independencia entre las tasas de crecimiento sectoriales y la informalidad, razón por la cual un cambio en los impuestos no necesariamente altera la dinámica del crecimiento económico.

Suggested Citation

  • Tobón, A, 2021. "Economía formal y economía informal: un estudio sobre la dinámica del crecimiento económico en un modelo de inspiración clásica," Documentos de trabajo - Alianza EFI 019292, Alianza EFI.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000561:019292
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    informalidad; sector informal; sector formal; impuestos; crecimientoeconómico;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E11 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Marxian; Sraffian; Kaleckian
    • E26 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Informal Economy; Underground Economy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm

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