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Higher Test Scores or More Schooling? Another Look at the Causes of Economic Growth

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  • Theodore R. Breton

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Abstract

I use a dynamic augmented Solow model to estimate the effects of students’ test scores and investment in schooling on economic growth rates in 49 countries during 1985-2005. In the complete data set, either average test scores or investment in schooling explain economic growth rates, and more of either causes growth. Further analysis reveals that higher test scores only raised growth rates in countries with low average levels of schooling. In countries with more than 7.5 years of schooling attainment in 1985, more investment in schooling raised growth rates, but higher average test scores did not.

Suggested Citation

  • Theodore R. Breton, 2013. "Higher Test Scores or More Schooling? Another Look at the Causes of Economic Growth," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 011832, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000122:011832
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Isaac Ehrlich & Jinyoung Kim, 2007. "The Evolution of Income and Fertility Inequalities over the Course of Economic Development: A Human Capital Perspective," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 137-174.
    2. Theodore Breton, 2010. "Schooling and national income: how large are the externalities?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 67-92.
    3. Hai-Anh Dang & F. Halsey Rogers, 2008. "The Growing Phenomenon of Private Tutoring: Does It Deepen Human Capital, Widen Inequalities, or Waste Resources?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 23(2), pages 161-200, April.
    4. Theodore Breton, 2010. "Schooling and national income: how large are the externalities? Corrected estimates," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 455-456.
    5. Theodore Breton, 2010. "Schooling and National Income: How Large Are the Externalities? Revised Estimates," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 010613, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
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    Cited by:

    1. Altinok, Nadir & Aydemir, Abdurrahman, 2017. "Does one size fit all? The impact of cognitive skills on economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 176-190.
    2. Breton, Theodore R., 2015. "Human capital and growth in Japan: Converging to the steady state in a 1% world," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 73-89.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education Expenditures; Human Capital; Test Scores; Economic Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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