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Elections as Targeting Contests

Author

Listed:
  • Cesar Martinelli

    (Centro de Investigacion Economica (CIE), Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico (ITAM))

Abstract

This paper develops a model of electoral turnout where parties compensate voters for showing up to the polls. Existence and uniqueness conditions are shown to impose substantial restrictions on the uncertainty about partisan support faced by the parties, and on the distribution of voting costs among citizens. The model predicts that voters in the minority will be more likely to vote, and that turnout increases with the importance of the election. The model can generate the observed correlation between election closeness and electoral turnout, lthough the cause of this correlation may depend on the distribution of voting costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Cesar Martinelli, 2006. "Elections as Targeting Contests," Working Papers 0601, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM, revised Mar 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:cie:wpaper:0601
    as

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    File URL: http://ftp.itam.mx/pub/academico/inves/martinelli/06-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy J. Feddersen, 2004. "Rational Choice Theory and the Paradox of Not Voting," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 99-112, Winter.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elections;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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