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Mortality Crisis in Russia Revisited: Evidence from Cross-regional Comparison

  • Vladimir Popov

    ()

    (New Economic School, Moscow)

This paper provides evidence from cross-regional comparisons that the Russian mortality crisis (mortality rate increased from 1.0% to 1.6% in 1989-94 and stayed at a level of 1.4- 1.6% thereafter) was caused mostly by stress factors (increased unemployment, labor turnover, migration, divorces, income inequalities), and by the increase in unnatural deaths (murders, suicides, accidents), but not so much by the increase in alcohol consumption (even though it also increased due to the same stress factors). Health infrastructure of a region had a positive impact on life expectancy only in regions with high income inequalities (large share of highest income group).

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File URL: http://www.cefir.ru/papers/WP157.pdf
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Paper provided by Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR) in its series Working Papers with number w0157.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfr:cefirw:w0157
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  1. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 2005. "Natural Selection and the Evolution of Life Expectancy," CEPR Discussion Papers 5373, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Vladimir Popov, 2007. "Shock Therapy versus Gradualism Reconsidered: Lessons from Transition Economies after 15 Years of Reforms1," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 49(1), pages 1-31, March.
  3. Cornia, G-A & Hokkila, J & Paniccia, R & Popov, V, 1996. "Long-Term Growth and Welfare in Trnasitional Economies : The Impact of Demographic, Investment and Social Policy Changes," Research Paper 122, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
  4. Yuri Andrienko & Sergei Guriev, 2004. "Determinants of interregional mobility in Russia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 12(1), pages 1-27, 03.
  5. Andrienko Yury & Nemtsov Aleksandr, 2005. "Estimation of individual demand for alcohol," EERC Working Paper Series 05-10e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
  6. Yuriy Andrienko & A. Nemtsov, 2006. "Estimation of Individual Demand for Alcohol," Working Papers w0089, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  7. Popov, Vladimir, 2001. "Reform Strategies and Economic Performance of Russia's Regions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 865-886, May.
  8. Vladimir Popov, 2001. "Reform Strategies and Economic Performance: The Russian Far East as Compared to Other Regions," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(4), pages 33-66, December.
  9. Vladimir Popov, 2000. "Shock Therapy Versus Gradualism: The End Of The Debate (Explaining The Magnitude Of Transformational Recession)," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(1), pages 1-57, April.
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