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Trading and Information Diffusion in Over-the-Counter Markets


  • Ana Babus
  • Péter Kondor


We model trading and information diffusion in OTC markets, when dealers can engage in many bilateral transactions at the same time. We show that information diffusion is effective, but not efficient. While each bilateral price partially reveals all dealers' private information after a single round of trading, dealers could learn more even within the constraints imposed by our environment. This is not a result of dealers' market power, but arises from the interaction between decentralization and differences in dealers' valuation of the asset. We apply our framework to confront several explanations for the disruption of OTC markets with stylized facts from the empirical literature. We find more support for narratives emphasizing increased counterparty risk as opposed to increased informational frictions.

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  • Ana Babus & Péter Kondor, 2012. "Trading and Information Diffusion in Over-the-Counter Markets," CEU Working Papers 2012_19, Department of Economics, Central European University, revised 09 Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:ceu:econwp:2012_19

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dimitri Vayanos & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2008. "A Search-Based Theory of the On-the-Run Phenomenon," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(3), pages 1361-1398, June.
    2. Xavier Vives, 2011. "Strategic Supply Function Competition With Private Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(6), pages 1919-1966, November.
    3. Ricardo Lagos & Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2007. "Crashes and recoveries in illiquid markets," Working Paper 0708, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    4. Albert S. Kyle, 1989. "Informed Speculation with Imperfect Competition," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 317-355.
    5. Friewald, Nils & Jankowitsch, Rainer & Subrahmanyam, Marti G., 2012. "Illiquidity or credit deterioration: A study of liquidity in the US corporate bond market during financial crises," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 18-36.
    6. Agarwal, Sumit & Chang, Yan & Yavas, Abdullah, 2012. "Adverse selection in mortgage securitization," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(3), pages 640-660.
    7. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
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    Cited by:

    1. De Kamps, Marc & Ladley, Daniel & Simaitis, Aistis, 2014. "Heterogeneous beliefs in over-the-counter markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 50-68.
    2. Trejos, Alberto & Wright, Randall, 2016. "Search-based models of money and finance: An integrated approach," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 10-31.
    3. Semyon Malamud & Marzena Rostek, 2012. "Decentralized Exchange," Working Papers 12-18, NET Institute.
    4. Andrew Atkeson & Andrea L. Eisfeldt & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2013. "The market for OTC derivatives," Staff Report 479, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    5. repec:eee:jfinec:v:124:y:2017:i:2:p:266-284 is not listed on IDEAS

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