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Dark Markets: Asset Pricing and Information Transmission in Over-the-Counter Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Darrell Duffie

Abstract

Over-the-counter (OTC) markets for derivatives, collateralized debt obligations, and repurchase agreements played a significant role in the global financial crisis. Rather than being traded through a centralized institution such as a stock exchange, OTC trades are negotiated privately between market participants who may be unaware of prices that are currently available elsewhere in the market. In these relatively opaque markets, investors can be in the dark about the most attractive available terms and who might be offering them. This opaqueness exacerbated the financial crisis, as regulators and market participants were unable to quickly assess the risks and pricing of these instruments. Dark Markets offers a concise introduction to OTC markets by explaining key conceptual issues and modeling techniques, and by providing readers with a foundation for more advanced subjects in this field. Darrell Duffie covers the basic methods for modeling search and random matching in economies with many agents. He gives an overview of asset pricing in OTC markets with symmetric and asymmetric information, showing how information percolates through these markets as investors encounter each other over time. This book also features appendixes containing methodologies supporting the more theory-oriented of the chapters, making this the most self-contained introduction to OTC markets available.

Suggested Citation

  • Darrell Duffie, 2012. "Dark Markets: Asset Pricing and Information Transmission in Over-the-Counter Markets," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9623, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:pup:pbooks:9623
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:ecnote:v:46:y:2017:i:1:p:53-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hau, Harald & Hoffmann, Peter & Langfield, Sam & Timmer, Yannick, 2017. "Discriminatory pricing of over-the-counter derivatives," ESRB Working Paper Series 61, European Systemic Risk Board.
    3. Uslu, Semih, 2015. "Pricing and Liquidity in Decentralized Asset Markets," MPRA Paper 73901, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Sep 2016.
    4. Benjamin Lester & Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre‐Olivier Weill, 2015. "Competing for Order Flow in OTC Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(S2), pages 77-126, June.
    5. Drew D. Creal & Robert B. Gramacy & Ruey S. Tsay, 2014. "Market-Based Credit Ratings," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 430-444, July.
    6. Vincent Glode & Christian Opp, 2016. "Asymmetric Information and Intermediation Chains," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(9), pages 2699-2721, September.
    7. Berentsen, Aleksander & McBride, Michael & Rocheteau, Guillaume, 2017. "Limelight on dark markets: Theory and experimental evidence on liquidity and information," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 70-90.
    8. Carruthers, Bruce G., 2013. "Diverging derivatives: Law, governance and modern financial markets," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 386-400.
    9. repec:eee:pacfin:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:14-33 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Song Han & Kleopatra Nikolaou, 2016. "Trading Relationships in the OTC Market for Secured Claims : Evidence from Triparty Repos," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-064, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Jorge Abad & Iñaki Aldasoro & Christoph Aymanns & Marco D'Errico & Linda Fache Rousová & Peter Hoffmann & Sam Langfield & Martin Neychev & Tarik Roukny, 2016. "Shedding light on dark markets: First insights from the new EU-wide OTC derivatives dataset," ESRB Occasional Paper Series 11, European Systemic Risk Board.
    12. Ruffini, Ivana & Steigerwald, Robert, 2014. "OTC Derivatives—A Primer on Market Infrastructure and Regulatory Policy," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q III, pages 80-99.
    13. Glasserman, Paul & Young, H. Peyton, 2016. "Contagion in financial networks," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68681, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    14. Stephan Lauermann & Gábor Virág, 2012. "Auctions in Markets: Common Outside Options and the Continuation Value Effect," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 107-130, November.
    15. Paul Glasserman & H. Peyton Young, 2015. "Contagion in Financial Markets," Working Papers 15-21, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
    16. Alain B'elanger & Ndoun'e Ndoun'e & Roland Pongou, 2018. "Dark Markets with Multiple Assets: Segmentation, Asymptotic Stability, and Equilibrium Prices," Papers 1806.01924, arXiv.org.
    17. Marco D'Errico & Tarik Roukny, 2017. "Compressing Over-the-Counter Markets," Papers 1705.07155, arXiv.org.
    18. D'Errico, Marco & Roukny, Tarik, 2017. "Compressing over-the-counter markets," ESRB Working Paper Series 44, European Systemic Risk Board.
    19. Paul Glasserman & H. Peyton Young, 2016. "Contagion in Financial Networks," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(3), pages 779-831, September.

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