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The Gilets Jaunes: Offline and Online

Author

Listed:
  • Pierre C. Boyer
  • Thomas Delemotte
  • Germain Gauthier
  • Vincent Rollet
  • Benoît Schmutz

Abstract

We study the Gilets jaunes movement, which blocked most of France off in November 2018. We first analyze the complementarity/substitutability between the different forms of mobilization and find that blockades were planned online and later reinforced online activism. Second, we do textual analysis and show that online discussions evolved from local concerns to widespread critique. Finally, while the Gilets jaunes refused to designate candidates for the subsequent European elections, we ask whether the movement had electoral consequences nonetheless. We show that blockades boosted the performance of the government's party in its bastions, except when they nurtured further online dissent.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre C. Boyer & Thomas Delemotte & Germain Gauthier & Vincent Rollet & Benoît Schmutz, 2020. "The Gilets Jaunes: Offline and Online," CESifo Working Paper Series 8326, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_8326
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    Cited by:

    1. Léa Bou Sleiman, 2021. "Are car-free centers detrimental to the periphery? Evidence from the pedestrianization of the Parisian riverbank," Working Papers 2021-03, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gilets jaunes; yellow vests; protests; social media; spatial inequalities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J80 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - General
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods

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