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Distributional Dominance with Dirty Data

  • Frank A Cowell
  • Maria-Pia Victoria-Feser

Distributional dominance criteria are commonly applied to draw welfare inferences about comparisons, but conclusions drawn from empirical implementations of dominance criteria may be influenced by data contamination. We examine a non-parametric approach to refining Lorenz-type comparisons and apply the technique to two important examples from the LIS data-base.

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Paper provided by Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE in its series STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers with number 51.

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Date of creation: Aug 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cep:stidar:51
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  1. Danziger, Sheldon & Taussig, Michael K, 1979. "The Income Unit and the Anatomy of Income Distribution," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 25(4), pages 365-75, December.
  2. Ben-Horim, Moshe, 1990. "Stochastic Dominance and Truncated Sample Data," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 13(2), pages 105-16, Summer.
  3. Gottschalk, Peter & Smeeding, Timothy M., 2000. "Empirical evidence on income inequality in industrialized countries," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 261-307 Elsevier.
  4. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1983. "Ranking Income Distributions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 50(197), pages 3-17, February.
  5. Moyes, Patrick, 1987. "A new concept of Lorenz domination," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 203-207.
  6. Cowell, Frank A, 1984. "The Structure of American Income Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 30(3), pages 351-75, September.
  7. Frank A Cowell & Maria-Pia Victoria-Feser, 1999. "Statistical Inference for Welfare under Complete and Incomplete Information," STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers 47, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  8. Amiel, Yoram & Cowell, Frank, 1994. "Monotonicity, dominance and the Pareto principle," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 447-450, August.
  9. Atkinson, A. B. & Bourguignon, F., 1990. "The design of direct taxation and family benefits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 3-29, February.
  10. Rubin Saposnik, 1981. "Rank-dominance in income distributions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 147-151, January.
  11. Coulter, Fiona A E & Cowell, Frank A & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1992. "Equivalence Scale Relativities and the Extent of Inequality and Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(414), pages 1067-82, September.
  12. Bishop, John A. & Formby, John P. & Thistle, Paul D., 1991. "Rank dominance and international comparisons of income distributions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1399-1409, October.
  13. Rubin Saposnik, 1983. "On evaluating income distributions: Rank dominance, the Suppes-Sen grading principle of justice, and Pareto optimality," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 329-336, January.
  14. Cowell, Frank A & Victoria-Feser, Maria-Pia, 1996. "Robustness Properties of Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(1), pages 77-101, January.
  15. Frank A. Cowell & Maria-Pia Victoria-Feser, 2002. "Welfare Rankings in the Presence of Contaminated Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 1221-1233, May.
  16. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
  17. Buhmann, Brigitte, et al, 1988. "Equivalence Scales, Well-Being, Inequality, and Poverty: Sensitivity Estimates across Ten Countries Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 34(2), pages 115-42, June.
  18. van Praag, Bernard M S & Hagenaars, Aldi J M & van Eck, Wim, 1983. "The Influence of Classification and Observation Errors on the Measurement of Income Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(4), pages 1093-108, July.
  19. Howes, Stephen, 1996. "The Influence of Aggregation on the Ordering of Distributions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 253-72, May.
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