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On 'Consistent' Poverty

  • Rod Hick
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    The measurement of poverty as 'consistent' poverty offers a solution to one of the primary problems of poverty measurement within Social Policy of the last three decades. Often treated as if they were synonymous, 'indirect' measures of poverty, such as low income measures, and 'direct' measures, such as indices of material deprivation, identify surprisingly different people as being poor. In response to this mismatch, a team of Irish researchers put forward a measure which identified respondents in as being in poverty when they experienced both a low standard of living, as measured by deprivation indicators, and a lack of resources, as measured by a low income line. Importantly, they argued that the two measures required an equal weight. In this paper, I present a reconsideration of the consistent poverty measure from both conceptual and empirical perspectives. In particular, I examine the claim that low income and material deprivation measures should be given an 'equal weight'. I argue that, from a conceptual perspective, the nature of the indicators at hand means that a deprivation-led measurement approach might be understood to align with the definition of poverty which Nolan and Whelan outline and, from an empirical perspective, that it is the material deprivation measure - and not the low income measure - which is particularly effective in identifying individuals at risk of multiple forms of deprivation.

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    File URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/casepaper167.pdf
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    Paper provided by Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE in its series CASE Papers with number case167.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:sticas:case167
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/case/_new/publications/default.asp

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    1. R. Wiggins & G. Netuveli & M. Hyde & P. Higgs & D. Blane, 2008. "The Evaluation of a Self-enumerated Scale of Quality of Life (CASP-19) in the Context of Research on Ageing: A Combination of Exploratory and Confirmatory Approaches," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 89(1), pages 61-77, October.
    2. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2011. "Changing Fortunes: Income Mobility and Poverty Dynamics in Britain," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199226436, March.
    3. Atkinson, Tony & Cantillon, Bea & Marlier, Eric & Nolan, Brian, 2002. "Social Indicators: The EU and Social Inclusion," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199253494, March.
    4. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 2011. "Poverty and Deprivation in Europe," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199588435, March.
    5. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 1996. "Resources, Deprivation, and Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287858, March.
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