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Foreign Direct Investment and Prospects for the Northern Region


  • Jonathan Jones
  • Colin Wren


This paper's purpose is to review the recent experience of foreign direct investment (FDI) in North East England, and to explore the implications of this for the region's prospective economic development. Foreign-owned plants are reckoned to account for more than half the North East's employment in manufacturing, so that the future economic prospects of the region rest heavily on the performance of this stock of FDI plants. Further, the attraction of FDI continues to be a vital component of the region's economic strategy (One NorthEast, 2005), while the Regional Development Agency (RDA) supports initiatives to both develop and 'embed' these plants in the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Jones & Colin Wren, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment and Prospects for the Northern Region," SERC Discussion Papers 0004, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0004

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Griffith, Rachel, 1999. "Using the ARD Establishment Level Data to Look at Foreign Ownership and Productivity in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages 416-442, June.
    2. Jonathan Jones & Colin Wren, 2004. "Do Inward Investors Achieve their Job Targets?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(4), pages 483-513, September.
    3. McCloughan, Patrick & Stone, Ian, 1998. "Life duration of foreign multinational subsidiaries: Evidence from UK northern manufacturing industry 1970-93," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 719-747, November.
    4. N. A. Phelps & Danny Mackinnon & Ian Stone & Paul Braidford, 2003. "Embedding the Multinationals? Institutions and the Development of Overseas Manufacturing Affiliates in Wales and North East England," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 27-40.
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