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Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets

Author

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  • Nesbitt, Kevin
  • Sperling, Daniel

Abstract

Public and private vehicle fleets have long been targeted as an ideal initial market for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). We examine seven widely accepted hypotheses regarding the potential fleet market for AFVs. The hypotheses are tested using data and information collected from focus group sessions, one-on-one interviews with fleet operators, and a large two-part survey administered to over 2700 California fleets, as well as secondary sources. We find a large number of misconceptions by both fleet operators and policymakers that lead to distorted expectations and ineffective policies regarding the purchase and use of AFVs by fleets.

Suggested Citation

  • Nesbitt, Kevin & Sperling, Daniel, 1998. "Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt07c9h9cd, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsdav:qt07c9h9cd
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    Cited by:

    1. Williams, Brett D & Kurani, Kenneth S, 2007. "Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt34x5p0kn, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    2. Williams, Brett D, 2010. "Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt15f9495j, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Kuby, Michael, 2019. "The opposite of ubiquitous: How early adopters of fast-filling alt-fuel vehicles adapt to the sparsity of stations," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 46-57.
    4. Zhang, Yong & Yu, Yifeng & Zou, Bai, 2011. "Analyzing public awareness and acceptance of alternative fuel vehicles in China: The case of EV," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7015-7024.
    5. Demeulenaere, Xavier, 2019. "The use of automotive fleets to support the diffusion of Alternative Fuel Vehicles: A Rapid Evidence Assessment of barriers and decision mechanisms," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    6. Williams, Brett D, 2007. "Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt16k010cq, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    7. Melaina, Marc W., 2007. "Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 4919-4934, October.
    8. Tzeng, Gwo-Hshiung & Lin, Cheng-Wei & Opricovic, Serafim, 2005. "Multi-criteria analysis of alternative-fuel buses for public transportation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1373-1383, July.
    9. Sierzchula, William & Bakker, Sjoerd & Maat, Kees & van Wee, Bert, 2014. "The influence of financial incentives and other socio-economic factors on electric vehicle adoption," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 183-194.
    10. Zhang, Yong & Jiang, Yunjian & Rui, Weina & Thompson, Russell G., 2019. "Analyzing truck fleets’ acceptance of alternative fuel freight vehicles in China," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 1148-1155.
    11. Pierre Camilleri & Laetitia Dablanc, 2017. "An assessment of present and future competitiveness of electric commercial vans," Post-Print hal-01539105, HAL.
    12. Farrell, Alexander E. & Keith, David W. & Corbett, James J., 2003. "A strategy for introducing hydrogen into transportation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(13), pages 1357-1367, October.
    13. Melaina, Marc & Bremson, Joel, 2008. "Refueling availability for alternative fuel vehicle markets: Sufficient urban station coverage," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 3223-3231, August.
    14. Campíñez-Romero, Severo & Colmenar-Santos, Antonio & Pérez-Molina, Clara & Mur-Pérez, Francisco, 2018. "A hydrogen refuelling stations infrastructure deployment for cities supported on fuel cell taxi roll-out," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 1018-1031.
    15. Williams, Brett D, 2007. "Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt4kv151dp, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    16. Zhao, Jimin & Melaina, Marc W., 2006. "Transition to hydrogen-based transportation in China: Lessons learned from alternative fuel vehicle programs in the United States and China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1299-1309, July.
    17. Kelley, Scott & Kuby, Michael, 2017. "Decentralized refueling of compressed natural gas (CNG) fleet vehicles in Southern California," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 350-359.

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