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Intergenerational Mobility in China

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  • Kelly LABAR

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    In this paper, I study the intergenerational mobility of education and income in China. Using the CHNS database which gives information on parental educational attainment and income level, I show that there is a relatively high intergenerational mobility in China, compared to other developed and developing countries. Even if parents' social characteristics influence the child's ones, the transmission of parents' educational and income level remains low. Nevertheless, I stress a growing impact of parents' income on the determination of children educational attainment, what can be an increasing factor of income inequality in the future. Moreover, I emphasize that parents' farming activity plays an important and significant negative role in the child's educational level.

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    File URL: http://publi.cerdi.org/ed/2007/2007.29.pdf
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    Paper provided by CERDI in its series Working Papers with number 200729.

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    Length: 16
    Date of creation: 2007
    Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:930
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    1. Zhang, Xiaobo & Kanbur, Ravi, 2005. "Spatial inequality in education and health care in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 189-204.
    2. Wan, Guanghua & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2006. "Rising inequality in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 651-653, December.
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    4. Miles Corak & Andrew Heisz, 1999. "The Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility of Canadian Men: Evidence from Longitudinal Income Tax Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 504-533.
    5. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
    6. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1994. "Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure 1963-1987: Application of Quantile Regression," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 405-458, March.
    7. Checchi, Daniele & Ichino, Andrea & Rustichini, Aldo, 1999. "More equal but less mobile?: Education financing and intergenerational mobility in Italy and in the US," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 351-393, December.
    8. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Li, Shi, 2004. "Expenditures on education and health care and poverty in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 292-301.
    9. Behrman, Jere & Tarbman, Paul, 1985. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the United States: Some Estimates and a Test of Becker's Intergenerational Endowments Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 144-151, February.
    10. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
    11. Coady, David P. & Wang, Limin, 2000. "Equity, efficiency, and labor-market reforms in urban China: the impact of bonus wages on the distribution of earnings," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 213-231.
    12. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, November.
    13. Holmlund, Helena, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Assortative Mating. Effects of an Educational Reform," Working Paper Series 4/2006, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    14. Grawe, Nathan D., 2006. "Lifecycle bias in estimates of intergenerational earnings persistence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 551-570, October.
    15. Piketty, Thomas, 2000. "Theories of persistent inequality and intergenerational mobility," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 429-476 Elsevier.
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