IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Methodological Status of Agent-Based Simulations

  • Roberto Leombruni

In this paper I give a tentative assessment of the methodological status of agent based simulations. I first show under which conditions ABS can be a complement to traditional modelling. I then consider whether they can be held as a sound methodology of their own. Various topics relevant to the argument are briefly discussed, such as the forecasting role of theories, the realism of assumptions, Hayek’s insights on economics methodology. I cast the arguments given into some results of modern theory of abductive inference, providing a framework that helps clarify the logical status of simulations, and gives some hints on how to foster their role as a self sustained tool for economic reasoning.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.laboratoriorevelli.it/_pdf/wp19.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies in its series LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series with number 19.

as
in new window

Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cca:wplabo:19
Contact details of provider: Postal: Via Real Collegio, 30, 10024 Moncalieri (To)
Phone: +390116705000
Fax: +390116476847
Web page: http://www.laboratoriorevelli.it/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Joshua M. Epstein & Robert L. Axtell, 1996. "Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550253, June.
  2. Nick Vriend, 2000. "Was Hayek An Ace?," Computing in Economics and Finance 2000 272, Society for Computational Economics.
  3. Judd, Kenneth L., 1997. "Computational economics and economic theory: Substitutes or complements?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 907-942, June.
  4. Nigel Gilbert & Pietro Terna, 2000. "How to build and use agent-based models in social science," Mind and Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 1(1), pages 57-72, March.
  5. Paul J. McNulty, 1967. "A Note on the History of Perfect Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 395.
  6. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-37, May.
  7. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2000. "Agent-Based Computational Economics: A Brief Guide to the Literature," Computational Economics 0004001, EconWPA.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cca:wplabo:19. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Giovanni Bert)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.