IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cbt/econwp/20-08.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Note on the Use of Partial Correlation Coefficients in Meta-Analyses

Author

Abstract

Meta-analyses in economics, business, and the social sciences commonly use partial correlation coefficients (PCCs) when the original estimated effects cannot be combined. This can occur, for example, when the primary studies use different measures for the dependent and independent variables, even though they are all concerned with estimating the same conceptual effect. This note demonstrates that analyses based on PCCs can produce different results than those based on the original, estimated effects. This can affect conclusions about the overall mean effect, the factors responsible for differences in estimated effects across studies, and the existence of publication selection bias. I first derive the theoretical relationship between Fixed Effects/Weighted Least Squares estimates of the overall mean effect when using the original estimated effects and their PCC transformations. I then provide two empirical examples from recently published studies. The first empirical analysis is an example where the use of PCCs does not change the main conclusions. The second analysis is an example where the conclusions are substantially impacted. I explain why the use of PCCs had different effects in the two examples.

Suggested Citation

  • W. Robert Reed, 2020. "A Note on the Use of Partial Correlation Coefficients in Meta-Analyses," Working Papers in Economics 20/08, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbt:econwp:20/08
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://repec.canterbury.ac.nz/cbt/econwp/2008.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark A. Cohen & Adeline Tubb, 2018. "The Impact of Environmental Regulation on Firm and Country Competitiveness: A Meta-analysis of the Porter Hypothesis," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 371-399.
    2. Ichiro IWASAKI & Satoshi MIZOBATA, 2018. "Post-Privatization Ownership And Firm Performance: A Large Meta-Analysis Of The Transition Literature," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 263-322, June.
    3. Petra Valickova & Tomas Havranek & Roman Horvath, 2015. "Financial Development And Economic Growth: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 506-526, July.
    4. Shushu Li & Jinglan Zhang & Yong Ma, 2015. "Financial Development, Environmental Quality and Economic Growth," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-22, July.
    5. Megan Linde Leonard & T. D. Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2014. "Does the UK Minimum Wage Reduce Employment? A Meta-Regression Analysis," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(3), pages 499-520, September.
    6. Philip Arestis & Georgios Chortareas & Georgios Magkonis, 2015. "The Financial Development And Growth Nexus: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 549-565, July.
    7. Randolph Luca Bruno & Maria Cipollina, 2018. "A meta†analysis of the indirect impact of foreign direct investment in old and new EU member states: Understanding productivity spillovers," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(5), pages 1342-1377, May.
    8. Michiel Bijlsma & Clemens Kool & Marielle Non, 2018. "The effect of financial development on economic growth: a meta-analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(57), pages 6128-6148, December.
    9. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Vinod Mishra, 2018. "Returns to education in China: a meta-analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(54), pages 5903-5919, November.
    10. Shanthi Nataraj & Francisco Perez-Arce & Krishna B. Kumar & Sinduja V. Srinivasan, 2014. "The Impact Of Labor Market Regulation On Employment In Low-Income Countries: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 551-572, July.
    11. Mohammed Ziaur Rehman & Nasir Ali & Najeeb Muhammad Nasir, 2015. "Financial Development, Savings and Economic Growth: Evidence from Bahrain Using VAR," International Journal of Financial Research, International Journal of Financial Research, Sciedu Press, vol. 6(2), pages 112-123, April.
    12. Awaworyi Churchill, S. & Yew, S.L., 2017. "Are government transfers harmful to economic growth? A meta-analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 270-287.
    13. Kun Wang & Greg Shailer, 2015. "Ownership Concentration And Firm Performance In Emerging Markets: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(2), pages 199-229, April.
    14. Jessica S. Merkle & Michelle Andrea Phillips, 2018. "The Wage Impact Of Teachers Unions: A Meta‐Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(1), pages 93-115, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. DUAN & REED: How Are Meta-Analyses Different Across Disciplines?
      by replicationnetwork in The Replication Network on 2021-05-18 03:13:56

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Filomena, Mattia & Picchio, Matteo, 2021. "Retirement and health outcomes in a meta-analytical framework," GLO Discussion Paper Series 897, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Jianhua Duan & Kuntal K. Das & Laura Meriluoto & W. Robert Reed, 2019. "Spillovers and Exports: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 19/03, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    2. Jianhua Duan & Kuntal K. Das & Laura Meriluoto & W. Robert Reed, 2020. "Estimating the effect of spillovers on exports: a meta-analysis," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 156(2), pages 219-249, May.
    3. repec:wly:econjl:v::y:2017:i:605:p:f236-f265 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mr. Etibar Jafarov & Mr. Marco Pani & Mr. Rodolfo Maino, 2019. "Financial Repression is Knocking at the Door, Again," IMF Working Papers 2019/211, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Fei Guo & Shi He, 2020. "The finance-growth nexus in China: a meta-analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(13), pages 1071-1075, June.
    6. John P. A. Ioannidis & T. D. Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2017. "The Power of Bias in Economics Research," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(605), pages 236-265, October.
    7. Guangdong Xu & Binwei Gui, 2021. "The non‐linearity between finance and economic growth: a literature review and evidence from China," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 35(1), pages 3-18, May.
    8. Michal Brzozowski, 2019. "Access to Credit and Growth of Firms," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 69(3), pages 253-274, June.
    9. Roman Horvath, 2020. "Natural Catastrophes and Financial Development: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers IES 2020/14, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised May 2020.
    10. Anna Sokolova & Todd Sorensen, 2021. "Monopsony in Labor Markets: A Meta-Analysis," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 74(1), pages 27-55, January.
    11. Cher Chen & GholamReza Zandi Pour & Edwin R. de los Reyes, 2020. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Asian Countries: A Panel Empirical Investigation," International Journal of Applied Economics, Finance and Accounting, Online Academic Press, vol. 6(2), pages 76-84.
    12. Roman Horvath & Ali Elminejad & Tomas Havranek, 2020. "Publication and Identification Biases in Measuring the Intertemporal Substitution of Labor Supply," Working Papers IES 2020/32, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Sep 2020.
    13. Marcin Humanicki & Krzysztof Olszewski, 2020. "The Heterogeneous Nature of FDI in Central and Eastern Europe. Impact of the Entry Mode on the Host Country’s Economic Growth," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 70(6), pages 541-565, December.
    14. Adriaan Van Velthoven & Jakob De Haan & Jan-Egbert Sturm, 2019. "Finance, income inequality and income redistribution," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(14), pages 1202-1209, August.
    15. Małgorzata Iwanicz-Drozdowska & Paola Bongini & Paweł Smaga & Bartosz Witkowski, 2019. "The role of banks in CESEE countries: exploring non-standard determinants of economic growth," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 349-382, May.
    16. Ichiro Iwasaki, 2020. "Meta-Analysis of Emerging Markets and Economies: An Introductory Note for the Special Issue," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(1), pages 1-9, January.
    17. Samargandi, Nahla & Kutan, Ali M. & Sohag, Kazi & Alqahtani, Faisal, 2020. "Equity market and money supply spillovers and economic growth in BRICS economies: A global vector autoregressive approach," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C).
    18. Matilde Cardoso & Pedro Cunha Neves & Oscar Afonso & Elena Sochirca, 2021. "The effects of offshoring on wages: a meta-analysis," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 157(1), pages 149-179, February.
    19. Armand Fouejieu & Ratna Sahay & Martin Cihak & Shiyuan Chen, 2020. "Financial inclusion and inequality: A cross-country analysis," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(8), pages 1018-1048, November.
    20. Georgeta Soava & Anca Mehedintu & Mihaela Sterpu & Mircea Raduteanu, 2020. "Impact of Employed Labor Force, Investment, and Remittances on Economic Growth in EU Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(23), pages 1-31, December.
    21. Enrique Acebo & José-Ángel Miguel-Dávila & Mariano Nieto, 2021. "The Impact of University–Industry Relationships on Firms’ Performance: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(2), pages 276-293.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Meta-analysis; Publication bias; FAT-PET; Meta-regression analysis; Partial correlation coefficients;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C18 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Methodolical Issues: General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cbt:econwp:20/08. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/decannz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Albert Yee (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/decannz.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.