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Work Intensification and Employment Insecurity in Professional Work

Author

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  • Suzanne J. Konzelmann
  • Frank Wilkinson
  • Roy Mankelow

Abstract

Professional work is a category of employment that has traditionally been associated with high levels of worker autonomy, economic and social status. During the past decade, changes in customer expectations, government policy and technology have generated pressures resulting in enhancement of the quality and efficiency of service provision, expansion in task requirements and a need for higher levels of discretion. In this sense, professional work has been upgraded. However, the changes have also led to a deterioration in the economic and social status of professional work, adversely impacting on the social and psychological well-being of professional workers. This paper examines these developments in five professions including two established professions (lawyers and pharmacists), one aspiring profession (midwives) and two emerging professions (counselling psychologists and human resource managers). The empirical findings are based on a survey of 1270 professional workers conducted in 2000 and 2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzanne J. Konzelmann & Frank Wilkinson & Roy Mankelow, 2007. "Work Intensification and Employment Insecurity in Professional Work," Working Papers wp345, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp345 Note: PRO-2
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    File URL: https://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/centre-for-business-research/downloads/working-papers/wp345.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Broadbent, Jane & Laughlin, Richard, 1997. "Contracts and Competition? A Reflection on the Nature and Effects of Recent Legislation on Modes of Control in Schools," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(2), pages 277-290, March.
    2. Leland, Hayne E, 1979. "Quacks, Lemons, and Licensing: A Theory of Minimum Quality Standards," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1328-1346, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Professional work; counseling psychologists; human resource managers; lawyers; midwives; pharmacists; job satisfaction and morale.;

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • L84 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Personal, Professional, and Business Services

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