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Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?

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  • Green, R.

Abstract

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen-node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating losses and transmission constraints. It is solved with optimal prices, and with uniform prices for demand and for generation, re-dispatching when needed to take account of transmission constraints. Moving from uniform prices to optimal nodal prices could raise welfare by 1.5% of the generators’ revenues, and would be less vulnerable to market power. It would also send better investment signals, but create politically sensitive regional gains and losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Green, R., 2004. "Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0466, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0466 Note: CMI, IO
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    File URL: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/electricity/publications/wp/ep63.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Walawalkar, Rahul & Fernands, Stephen & Thakur, Netra & Chevva, Konda Reddy, 2010. "Evolution and current status of demand response (DR) in electricity markets: Insights from PJM and NYISO," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1553-1560.
    2. Bernard, Jean-Thomas & Cote, Bruno, 2005. "The measurement of the energy intensity of manufacturing industries: a principal components analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, pages 221-233.
    3. Joskow, Paul L., 2008. "Capacity payments in imperfect electricity markets: Need and design," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 159-170, September.
    4. Pepermans, Guido & Willems, Bert, 2010. "Cost Recovery in Congested Electricity Networks," Working Papers 2010/22, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    5. Kattuman, P.A. & Green, R.J. & Bialek, J.W., 2001. "A Tracing Method for Pricing Inter-Area Electricity Trades," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0107, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Rosellon, Juan & Tregear, Juan & Zenon, Eric, 2010. "El modelo HRV para expansión óptima de redes de transmisión: una aplicación a la red eléctrica de Ontario
      [The HRV Model for the Optimal Expansion of Transmission Networks: an Application to the On
      ," MPRA Paper 26471, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Strbac, Goran & Pollitt, Michael & Konstantinidis, Christos Vasilakos & Konstantelos, Ioannis & Moreno, Rodrigo & Newbery, David & Green, Richard, 2014. "Electricity transmission arrangements in Great Britain: Time for change?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 298-311.
    8. Brown, Sarah J. & Rowlands, Ian H., 2009. "Nodal pricing in Ontario, Canada: Implications for solar PV electricity," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 170-178.
    9. Richard Green, 2007. "Nodal pricing of electricity: how much does it cost to get it wrong?," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 125-149, April.
    10. Bernard, Jean-Thomas & Guertin, Chantal, 2000. "Nodal Pricing and Transmissions Losses. An Application to a Hydroelectric Power System," Cahiers de recherche 0007, GREEN.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity Transmission Pricing; Welfare Losses; Market Power;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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