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Introduction to the Financial Macro-econometric Model

Author

Listed:
  • Atsushi Ishikawa

    (Bank of Japan)

  • Koichiro Kamada

    (Bank of Japan)

  • Yoshiyuki Kurachi

    (Bank of Japan)

  • Kentaro Nasu

    (Bank of Japan)

  • Yuki Teranishi

    (Bank of Japan)

Abstract

This paper introduces the Financial Macro-econometric Model (FMM) being developed by the Bank of Japan. The FMM is a medium-sized structural model comprising two sectors: a financial sector and a macroeconomic sector. It permits the quantitative analysis of various phenomena created by the feedback loop between the financial economy and the real economy. The model's most distinctive feature, which is rarely observed in this type of model, is seen in the financial sector, where we model the actual risk management behavior of banks. It facilitates macro stress testing and allows the robustness of the financial system and its effects on the macro economy to be consistently verified from various perspectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Atsushi Ishikawa & Koichiro Kamada & Yoshiyuki Kurachi & Kentaro Nasu & Yuki Teranishi, 2012. "Introduction to the Financial Macro-econometric Model," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 12-E-1, Bank of Japan.
  • Handle: RePEc:boj:bojwps:12-e-1
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    File URL: http://www.boj.or.jp/en/research/wps_rev/wps_2012/data/wp12e01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Sugo, Tomohiro & Ueda, Kozo, 2008. "Estimating a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model for Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 476-502, December.
    11. Flint Brayton & Eileen Mauskopf & David L. Reifschneider & Peter A. Tinsley & John Williams, 1997. "The role of expectations in the FRB/US macroeconomic model," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Apr, pages 227-245.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bank for International Settlements, 2016. "Experiences with the ex ante appraisal of macroprudential instruments," CGFS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 56, July.
    2. Ostap Okhrin & Alexander Ristig & Jeffrey Sheen & Stefan Trück, 2015. "Conditional Systemic Risk with Penalized Copula," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2015-038, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    3. Hiroshi Kawata & Tomiyuki Kitamura & Koji Nakamura & Yuki Teranishi & Saiki Tsuchiya, 2012. "Effects of the Loss and Correction of a Reference Rate on Japan's Economy and Financial System: Analysis Using the Financial Macro-econometric Model," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 12-E-11, Bank of Japan.
    4. Hiroshi Kawata & Yoshiyuki Kurachi & Koji Nakamura & Yuki Teranishi, 2013. "Impact of Macroprudential Policy Measures on Economic Dynamics: Simulation Using a Financial Macro-econometric Model," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 13-E-3, Bank of Japan.
    5. Robert-Paul Berben & Ide Kearney & Robert Vermeulen, 2018. "DELFI 2.0, DNB's Macroeconomic Policy Model of the Netherlands," DNB Occasional Studies 1605, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

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