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The effects of increased labour market flexibility in the United Kingdom: theory and practice

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  • Stephen P Millard

Abstract

This paper uses the increase in labour market flexibility in the United Kingdom in recent years to see how well the predictions of a couple of recently developed labour market models can account for data. The two models examined are an 'equilibrium business cycle' model of the labour market and a 'search' model. The models do well in predicting the fall in the level and persistence of the unemployment rate and average hours since about 1985 as well as the step increase in consumption and output that seems to have occured. Conversely, unemployment incidence has fallen and the volatilities of output, consumption, employment and unemployment have all increased in the most recent cycle contrary to the predictions of the models.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen P Millard, 2000. "The effects of increased labour market flexibility in the United Kingdom: theory and practice," Bank of England working papers 109, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:109
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    File URL: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/archive/Documents/historicpubs/workingpapers/2000/wp109.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Holland, Allison & Scott, Andrew, 1998. "The Determinants of UK Business Cycles," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(449), pages 1067-1092, July.
    4. Hodrick, Robert J & Prescott, Edward C, 1997. "Postwar U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, February.
    5. John A. Abowd & Thomas Lemieux, 1993. "The Effects of Product Market Competition on Collective Bargaining Agreements: The Case of Foreign Competition in Canada," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(4), pages 983-1014.
    6. Phil Evans, 1998. "Why has the female unemployment rate fallen so much in Britain?," Bank of England working papers 87, Bank of England.
    7. Cho, Jang-Ok & Cooley, Thomas F., 1994. "Employment and hours over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 411-432, March.
    8. Oliver Jean Blanchard & Peter Diamond, 1989. "The Beveridge Curve," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 20(1), pages 1-76.
    9. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
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