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Wage Trajectories of Workers in Poor Households

Author

Listed:
  • Helen Connolly

    () (Northeastern University)

  • Peter Gottschalk

    () (Boston College)

  • Katherine Newman

    (Kennedy School, Harvard University)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Connolly & Peter Gottschalk & Katherine Newman, 2003. "Wage Trajectories of Workers in Poor Households," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 555, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 25 Jul 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:555
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    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/EC-P/wp555.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
    2. Peter Gottschalk & Sheldon Danziger, 1997. "Family Income Mobility -- How Much Is There and Has It Changed?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 398, Boston College Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:cep:sticas:/122 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Stewart, Kitty, 2007. "Employment trajectories for mothers in low-skilled work: evidence from the British lone parent cohort," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6215, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Stewart, Kitty, 2011. "Employment trajectories and later employment outcomes for mothers in the British Household Panel Survey: an analysis by skill level," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 41396, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Kitty Stewart, 2007. "Employment trajectories for mothers in low-skilled work: Evidence from the British Lone Parent Cohort," CASE Papers case122, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Kitty Stewart, 2011. "Employment trajectories and later employment outcomes for mothers in the British Household Panel Survey: An analysis by skill level," CASE Papers case144, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage mobility; low wage labor markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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