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Technology Shocks and Monetary Policy in an Estimated Sticky Price Model of the Euro Area


  • Avouyi-Dovi, S.
  • Matheron, J.


In this paper, we seek to characterize the dynamic effects of permanent technology shocks and the way in which European monetary authorities reacted to these shocks over the past two decades. To do so, we develop an augmented sticky price-sticky wage model of the business cycle, which is estimated by minimizing the distance between theoretical, dynamic responses of key variables to a permanent technology shock and their structural VAR counterparts. In a second step, we conduct a counterfactual experiment consisting to compare these responses with the outcome of the optimal monetary policy. A significant discrepancy emerges between these responses, suggesting the European monetary authorities might not have responded optimally to permanent technology shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Avouyi-Dovi, S. & Matheron, J., 2005. "Technology Shocks and Monetary Policy in an Estimated Sticky Price Model of the Euro Area," Working papers 126, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:126

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Simon Gilchrist & John C. Williams, 2000. "Putty-Clay and Investment: A Business Cycle Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 928-960, October.
    2. Lawrence J. Christiano & Terry J. Fitzgerald, 2003. "The Band Pass Filter," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 435-465, May.
    3. Matheron, Julien & Maury, Tristan-Pierre, 2004. "Supply-side refinements and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(3), pages 391-396, March.
    4. Steve Ambler & Alain Guay & Louis Phaneuf, 1999. "Wage Contracts and Labor Adjustment Costs as Endogenous Propagation Mechanisms," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 69, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    5. Rudebusch, Glenn D., 2002. "Term structure evidence on interest rate smoothing and monetary policy inertia," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1161-1187, September.
    6. Beaudry, Paul & Guay, Alain, 1996. "What do interest rates reveal about the functioning of real business cycle models?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(9-10), pages 1661-1682.
    7. Erceg, Christopher J. & Henderson, Dale W. & Levin, Andrew T., 2000. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-313, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Julien Matheron, 2006. "Firm-Specific Labor and Firm-Specific Capital: Implications for the Euro-Data New Phillips Curve," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(4), December.

    More about this item


    Sticky prices and wages ; Taylor rule ; Optimal monetary policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies


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