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A Generalization of the Pfähler-Lambert Decomposition

Author

Listed:
  • Jorge Onrubia

    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

  • Fidel Picos

    (Universidade de Vigo)

  • María del Carmen Rodado

    (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to provide a generalization of the Pfähler (1990) and Lambert (1989, 2001) decomposition, which allows us to overcome some limitations of the original methodology. In particular, our proposal avoids the problem of sequentiality when the tax has several types of deductions or allowances, schedules or tax credits. In addition, our alternative decomposition is adapted to the dual income class of tax structures. Moreover, in order to adapt this methodology to real-world taxes, our approach includes the re-ranking effects of real taxes, caused by the existence of differentiated treatments based on non-income attributes. This theoretical proposal is illustrated with an empirical analysis for the Spanish Personal Income Tax reform enforced in 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorge Onrubia & Fidel Picos & María del Carmen Rodado, 2013. "A Generalization of the Pfähler-Lambert Decomposition," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1301, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper1301
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    File URL: http://icepp.gsu.edu/files/2015/03/ispwp1301.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pfahler, Wilhelm, 1990. "Redistributive Effect of Income Taxation: Decomposing Tax Base and Tax Rates Effects," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 121-129, April.
    2. Kakwani, Nanok C, 1977. "Measurement of Tax Progressivity: An International Comparison," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 87(345), pages 71-80, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Torregrosa Hetland, 2015. "Did democracy bring redistribution? Insights from the Spanish tax system, 1960–90," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 294-315.
    2. Jorge Onrubia & Fidel Picos-Sánchez & María Carmen Rodado, 2014. "Rethinking the Pfähler–Lambert decomposition to analyse real-world personal income taxes," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(4), pages 796-812, August.
    3. Sara Torregrosa Hetland, 2014. "A fiscal revolution? Progressivity in the Spanish tax system, 1960-1990," Working Papers 2014/8, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

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