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Labour Market Outcomes in the UK, NZ, Australia and the US: Observations on the Impact of Labour Market and Economic Reforms

Author

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  • Bob Gregory

Abstract

In this paper, the author focuses on labour market and economic reforms and their impact on economic growth, employment and wage outcomes in the longer term. To make the task more manageable the paper described the economic growth experiences of four English speaking countries. The author looks at the impact of the Tatcher reforms in the UK, the Douglas Reforms in New Zealand, and the Hawke Accord period and subsequent labour market reform in Australia. The US is taken as a comparison country that has not been subject to substantial shifts in government introduced labour market and economic reforms, except, perhaps, in area of immigration and very recently in the area of welfare reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Bob Gregory, 1999. "Labour Market Outcomes in the UK, NZ, Australia and the US: Observations on the Impact of Labour Market and Economic Reforms," CEPR Discussion Papers 401, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:401
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP401.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lewis Evans & Arthur Grimes & Bryce Wilkinson, 1996. "Economic Reform in New Zealand 1984-95: The Pursuit of Efficiency," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(4), pages 1856-1902, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hazledine, Tim & Quiggin, John, 2005. "No more free beer tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand 1984-2003," Risk and Sustainable Management Group Working Papers 151509, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    2. Michael Keating, 2003. "Earnings and Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 460, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    LABOUR MARKET ; ECONOMIC POLICY ; EMPLOYMENT ; ECONOMIC GROWTH;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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