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Microstructure Effects on Daily Return Volatility in Financial Markets

  • Andreas Krause
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    We simulate a series of daily returns from intraday price movements initiated by microstructure elements. Significant evidence is found that daily returns and daily return volatility exhibit first order autocorrelation, but trading volume and daily return volatility are not correlated, while intraday volatility is. We also consider GARCH effects in daily return series and show that estimates using daily returns are biased from the influence of the level of prices. Using daily price changes instead, we find evidence of a significant GARCH component. These results suggest that microstructure elements have a considerable influence on the return generating process.

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    Paper provided by in its series Papers with number cond-mat/0011295.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2000
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published in International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance, Vol. 6, No. 7 (2003) 739-765
    Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:cond-mat/0011295
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