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Fractal Markets Hypothesis and the Global Financial Crisis: Wavelet Power Evidence

  • Ladislav Kristoufek

We analyze whether the prediction of the fractal markets hypothesis about a dominance of specific investment horizons during turbulent times holds. To do so, we utilize the continuous wavelet transform analysis and obtained wavelet power spectra which give the crucial information about the variance distribution across scales and its evolution in time. We show that the most turbulent times of the Global Financial Crisis can be very well characterized by the dominance of short investment horizons which is in hand with the assertions of the fractal markets hypothesis.

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File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1310.1446
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Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1310.1446.

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Date of creation: Oct 2013
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Publication status: Published in Scientific Reports 3:2857, 2013
Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1310.1446
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://arxiv.org/

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  1. Ladislav Kristoufek, 2012. "Fractal Markets Hypothesis And The Global Financial Crisis: Scaling, Investment Horizons And Liquidity," Advances in Complex Systems (ACS), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(06), pages 1250065-1-1.
  2. Mike, Szabolcs & Farmer, J. Doyne, 2008. "An empirical behavioral model of liquidity and volatility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 200-234, January.
  3. Lukas Vacha & Jozef Barunik, 2012. "Co-movement of energy commodities revisited: Evidence from wavelet coherence analysis," Papers 1201.4776, arXiv.org.
  4. Alexandre Roch, 2011. "Liquidity risk, price impacts and the replication problem," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 399-419, September.
  5. Tim Bollerslev, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 1986/01, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  6. Rua, António & Nunes, Luís C., 2009. "International comovement of stock market returns: A wavelet analysis," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 632-639, September.
  7. Lukas Vacha & Karel Janda & Ladislav Kristoufek & David Zilberman, 2012. "Time-Frequency Dynamics of Biofuels-Fuels-Food System," Papers 1209.0900, arXiv.org.
  8. J. Doyne Farmer & Laszlo Gillemot & Fabrizio Lillo & Szabolcs Mike & Anindya Sen, 2004. "What really causes large price changes?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 383-397.
  9. Luís Francisco Aguiar-Conraria & Maria Joana Soares & Nuno Azevedo, 2007. "Using Wavelets to decompose time-frequency economic relations," NIPE Working Papers 17/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
  10. Jain, Prem C. & Joh, Gun-Ho, 1988. "The Dependence between Hourly Prices and Trading Volume," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(03), pages 269-283, September.
  11. Philipp Weber & Bernd Rosenow, 2006. "Large stock price changes: volume or liquidity?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 7-14.
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