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Influences of Knowledge of Wildlife Species on Patterns of Willingness to pay for their Conservation

  • Tisdell, Clement A.

Examines the influence of respondents’ knowledge of wildlife species on their willingness to pay for conservation of the individual species. It does so by using data generated by surveys of 204 individuals who participated in a structured experiment in which their knowledge of a selected set of wildlife species was increased. The species selected were Australian ones, mostly but not entirely, tropical ones. The species were divided into three taxa for the experiment; reptiles, mammals and birds. Each set of species in the taxa included some species expected to be poorly known initially and some anticipated to be well known. Respondents rated their knowledge of each species on a Likert scale, and changes in their average allocation of funds for the conservation of each species were examined as their knowledge increased. Some general relationships are observed.

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Paper provided by University of Queensland, School of Economics in its series Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers with number 48972.

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Date of creation: Dec 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uqseee:48972
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  1. Kevin J. Boyle, 1989. "Commodity Specification and the Framing of Contingent-Valuation Questions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(1), pages 57-63.
  2. Spash, Clive L., 2002. "Informing and forming preferences in environmental valuation: Coral reef biodiversity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 665-687, October.
  3. Kahneman, Daniel & Knetsch, Jack L., 1992. "Valuing public goods: The purchase of moral satisfaction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 57-70, January.
  4. Ajzen, Icek & Brown, Thomas C. & Rosenthal, Lori H., 1996. "Information Bias in Contingent Valuation: Effects of Personal Relevance, Quality of Information, and Motivational Orientation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 43-57, January.
  5. Clement A. Tisdell, 2014. "Sustainable agriculture," Chapters, in: Handbook of Sustainable Development, chapter 32, pages 517-531 Edward Elgar.
  6. Bandara, Ranjith & Tisdell, Clement A., 2003. "Willingness to pay for different degrees of Abundance of Elephants," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 48966, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  7. Karl C. Samples & John A. Dixon & KMarcia M. Gowen, 1986. "Information Disclosure and Endangered Species Valuation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 62(3), pages 306-312.
  8. Richard C. Bishop & Michael P. Welsh, 1992. "Existence Values in Benefit-Cost Analysis and Damage Assessment," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(4), pages 405-417.
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